INSTRUMENT PROCEDURES HANDBOOK
 

USE OF DESIGNATORS IN COMMUNICATIONS

In voice communications, the basic letter of a designator should be spoken in accordance with the ICAO spelling alphabet. Where the prefixes K, U or S, specified in 2., above, are used in voice communications, they should be pronounced as:
K = “Kopter” U = “Upper” S = “Supersonic” as in the English language.

Where suffixes F, G, Y or Z specified in 3., above, are used, the flight crew should not be required to use them in voice communications.
Example:
A11 will be spoken Alfa Eleven
UR5 will be spoken Upper Romeo Five
KB34 will be spoken Kopter Bravo Thirty Four
UW456 F will be spoken Upper Whiskey Four Fifty Six

Figure 3-36 depicts published RNAV routes in the Gulf of Mexico (black Q100, Q102, and Q105) that have been added to straighten out the flight segments and provide an alternative method of navigation to the LF airway (brown G26), that has since been terminated in this case. The Q designation is derived from the list of basic route designators previously covered, and correlates with the description for RNAV routes that do not form part of the regional networks of ATS routes. Notice the indirect reference to the RNAV requirement, with the note, Navigational Equipment Other than LF or VHF Required.

Notice in Figure 3-37 that this en route chart excerpt depicts three published RNAV jet routes, J804R, J888R, and J996R. The R suffix is a supplementary route designator denoting an RNAV route. The overlapping symbols for the AMOTT intersection and waypoint indicate that AMOTT can be identified by conventional navigation or by latitude and longitude coordinates. Although coordinates were originally included for aircraft equipped with INS systems, they are now a good way to cross check between the coordinates on the chart and in the FMS or GPS databases to ensure you are tracking on your intended en route course. The AMOTT RNAV waypoint includes bearing and distance from the ANCHORAGE VORTAC. In an effort to simplify the conversion to RNAV, some controlling agencies outside the U.S. have simply designated all conventional routes as RNAV routes at a certain flight level.

 
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