Scott Adair A Pilot, Loved By Many Died In Gyrocopter Crash At Valkaria Airport
 
  
 
 
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Scott Adair A Pilot, Loved By Many Died In Gyrocopter Crash At Valkaria Airport
 
By Eddy Metcalf
 

May 3, 2013 - On Monday, William “Scott” Adair, 58 of Palm Bay, Florida was killed on impact when his 582 Dominator gyrocopter, N85KY crashed into a parked Cessna 172 on the ramp at Valkaria Airport in Brevard County, Florida.

A gyrocopter is an autogyro also known as gyroplane, rotorcraft, or rotaplane. It is a type of rotorcraft which uses an unpowered rotor in autorotation to develop lift, and an engine-powered propeller. While similar to a helicopter rotor in appearance, the autogyro's rotor must have air flowing through the rotor disc to generate rotation. 

Although Adair was an experienced power paraglider pilot he was not an experienced gyrocopter pilot and this was is first solo flight. According to witnesses Adair was performing flight maneuvers in a single seat gyrocopter just before 8 AM. However, witnesses report that just before the crash Adair was having difficulty controlling the aircraft.  

Don Walker a Brevard County spokesperson said Adair was well known and liked at the airport. Adair enjoyed flying both foot-launch and trike paragliders in which he was well experienced at. For those not familiar with the term trike, it is a propeller powered glider with a three wheeled undercarriage, a four wheel setup would be called a quad. Foot paragliders would be an engine backpack mounted on the pilots back with some form of parachute. 

Adair started a company in 2006, called Time2Fly, LLC which is a Florida company that offered Powered Paragliding flight training for both trike and foot launch. Time2Fly was based out of Valkaria Airport (X59) in Brevard County, Florida. Adair was principal owner and he was a USPPA certified instructor. He also held an FAA Sport Pilot and Repairman's certificate.

Adair received an FAA Sport Pilot Certificate with limitations of Sport Endorsement(S) Powered Parachute Land and a logbook gyro endorsement.

 
 

 

Adair received an FAA Sport Pilot Certificate with limitations of Sport Endorsement(S) Powered Parachute Land and a logbook gyro endorsement. He also received a FAA certificate as a Repairman Light Sport Aircraft with limitations Inspection: Powered Parachute, N901XC, and serial No. W09XCR1286BF63037. Adair also owned and flew a Fresh Breeze powered parachute it was a 4 cycle Xcitor (trike) that he had registered with the FAA in 2008.

Adair was affiliated with the Palm Bay Police Department and help start an award winning police search and rescue team called “Search Operations Aerial Response” (S.O.A.R.). Adair helped originate the S.O.A.R. program over three years ago, he had trained multiple police personnel to become pilots, was a volunteer pilot with his own aircraft, and had participated with the police department in various search, recovery and safety operations.

The Palm Bay Police Department’s S.O.A.R. Unit provides aerial support for the agency utilizing two unconventional aircraft known as a powered parachute and powered paraglider trike. These aircraft provide aviation alternatives for agencies that can utilize air support but cannot afford the costs associated with traditional aircraft. The benefits to these aircraft are low acquisition costs, low operating costs, they are very portable requiring no hanger to store the units, they are easy to learn to operate, and safe to fly.

The aircraft have been used to search for persons and property, obtain aerial photos and video of critical infrastructure and crime scenes, and surveillance. The S.O.A.R. program does not require officers to fly on a fulltime basis. All S.O.A.R. unit members have full-time positions within the police department and only fly when deemed necessary or requested. The pilot-in-command always has the final decision on whether the aircraft and conditions are safe to fly.  

Palm Bay Police Department Chief Doug Muldoon said “the aircraft have been used to search for persons and property, obtain aerial photos and video of critical infrastructure and crime scenes, and surveillance. The S.O.A.R. program does not require officers to fly on a full-time basis. All S.O.A.R. unit members have fulltime positions within the police department and only fly when deemed necessary or requested. The pilot-in-command always has the final decision on whether the aircraft and conditions are safe to fly".

 
 
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