Boeing 787 Dreamliner Pilot Training Courses Receives FAA Approval


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Boeing 787 Dreamliner Pilot Training Courses Receives FAA Approval

By Jim Douglas

August 17, 2010 - Boeing Training & Flight Services has been granted provisional approval for its 787 Dreamliner pilot training courses by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). With the 787 pilot training courses, pilots can transition to the new airplane in five to 20 days, depending on pilot experience.

Boeing 777 pilots can qualify to fly the 787 in as little as five days, given the high level of commonality between the two airplane types.  

"Gaining FAA approval for our courses is a significant milestone as we ramp up to the start of flight training," said Mark Albert, director of Simulator Services and 787 Training Program, Boeing Training & Flight Services. "It validates our approach to provide world-class training solutions at great value for the 787 Dreamliner."


"This achievement is another important step in ensuring the readiness of our 787 support products and services," said Mike Fleming, 787 Director of Services and Support, Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

Local FAA offices will approve individual operator training courses and these may be based on provisional approvals. Boeing Training & Flight Services is working with the FAA to obtain provisional approval of the training devices at which point formal pilot training will commence. The provisional designation will be removed once the airplane is fully certified. 

The Boeing 787 pilot training program uses a sophisticated suite of training devices including a full-flight simulator, flight training device and desktop simulation station to ensure that pilots are ready to fly the Dreamliner. There are currently eight training suites at five Boeing Training & Flight Services locations around the world in Tokyo, Singapore, Shanghai, Seattle and Gatwick, U.K. 

"The Training & Flight Services team stands ready to provide best-in-class 787 pilot training," said Roei Ganzarski, chief customer officer, Boeing Training & Flight Services. "Our global network of campuses allows our customers to train where they want, when they want."  


The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a long range, mid-sized, wide-body, twin-engine jet airliner developed by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. It seats 210 to 330 passengers, depending on variant. Boeing states that it is the company's most fuel-efficient airliner and the world's first major airliner to use composite materials for most of its construction. Its development and production has involved a large-scale collaboration with numerous suppliers. 

On January 28, 2005, the aircraft's initial designation 7E7 was changed to 787. Early released concept images depicted a radical design with highly curved surfaces. On April 26, 2005, a year after the launch of the program, the final and more conventional external 787 design was set.  

The first 787 was unveiled in a roll-out ceremony on July 8, 2007 at Boeing's Everett assembly factory, by which time it had become the fastest-selling wide-body airliner in history with 677 orders. By April 2010, 866 Boeing 787s had been ordered by 56 customers. As of 2010, launch customer All Nippon Airways has the largest number of 787s on order.

Originally scheduled to enter service in May 2008, the aircraft's maiden flight took place on December 15, 2009 in the Seattle area and is currently undergoing flight testing with a goal of receiving its type certificate in late 2010.


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